Garlic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

If you follow my Facebook, you’ll know that Sundays are my roasting days.  I’ll pick up various veggies at the market and spend the day roasting to have a ready made supply for the week.  The veggies vary depending on what looks good and what I’m craving, but usually always include potatoes and onions, bell peppers, cauliflower, and Brussels Sprouts.  Sometimes I add spices, sometimes they are plain.  Sometimes I add oil, other times I leave it off.  Today I was in a garlicky mood, so I pressed some garlic to kick it up a notch and it turned out very well…not that any kind of roasted Brussels Sprouts would be bad in my opinion.  I also did the same with the cauliflower today and made the correlating recipe found here.

Alt=”Garlic Roasted Brussels Sprouts”

Ingredients:

  • 20 ounces Brussels Sprouts, washed, trimmed, and halved
  • 10-15 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt, to taste

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2. Place Brussels Sprouts and pressed garlic in a large mixing bowl. Add olive oil and toss well to coat.

3. Spread Brussels Sprouts in one layer on a large baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, remove from oven, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and toss. Place the baking sheet back in the oven for another 10 to 15 minutes or until tender. Remove from oven, sprinkle another pinch of salt and toss.

(Serves one if you’re me, but yields approximately four cups/servings)

Garlic Roasted Brussels Sprouts Recipe Card

Alt=”Garlic Roasted Brussels Sprouts”

Did you make this recipe?  Please let me know how it turned out for you! Leave a comment below and share a picture using #gingerveganista on Instagram and tag @TheGingerVeganista or Twitter and tag @GingerVeganista or Facebook and tag The Ginger Veganista.  Can’t wait to hear from you!

Rainbow Beet Salad with Sesame Dressing

First of all, when your ingredients look like this, you know you’re onto something amazing…

Alt=”Rainbow Beet Salad with Sesame Dressing”

This salad is so beautiful.  The fresh beet flavor really shines and is enhanced with the light sesame dressing.  A truly divine plant-based dish!

The prep work is hard and can get messy…those red beets can make your kitchen (and your hands) look like a murder scene!  I am prepared now, though, and line my workstation with paper towels and use gloves while grating.  Your hard work will pay off, though, when you finally get to sit down and enjoy a yummy bowl of goodness

Ingredients:

Salad

  • 3 medium red beets, washed, trimmed, peeled, and shredded (yields approximately 2 cups)
  • 3 medium golden beets, washed, trimmed, peeled, and shredded (yields approximately 2 cups)
  • 4 medium carrots, washed, trimmed, peeled, and shredded (yields approximately 1 cup)
  • 2 cups kale, washed and chopped
  • 4 green onions, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, roasted, white and/or black

Dressing

  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup rice vinegar
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 3 cloves garlic, grated or finely minced
  • 1 small shallot, grated or finely minced

Directions:

1. Make the sauce first to allow time for the flavors to meld. Grate the garlic and shallot over a small bowl.  I prefer to grate, which allows them to dissolve into the sauce, but it you don’t have a grater or microplane, a fine mince will do.  Add the soy sauce, rice vinegar, water, sesame oil, and maple syrup. Stir well.

2. Wash all veggies to remove any dirt. Trim, peel, and shred the beets and carrots. Place the shredded veggies in a cheesecloth or paper towel and squeeze to drain excess moisture. Trim and chop the kale. Slice the green onions. Place all veggies into a large bowl and toss to mix well.

3. Pour the sauce over the salad and toss to coat the veggies. Garnish with sesame seeds.

Alt=”Rainbow Beet Salad with Sesame Dressing”

Did you make this recipe?  Please let me know how it turned out for you! Leave a comment below and share a picture using #gingerveganista on Instagram and tag @TheGingerVeganista or Twitter and tag @GingerVeganista or Facebook and tag The Ginger Veganista.  Can’t wait to hear from you!

Organic Produce: The Dirty Dozen and The Clean Fifteen

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) breaks down which fruits and vegetables contain the most pesticide residues.  The EWG’s 2015 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce states a whopping two-thirds of the over 3,000 samples tested by the USDA in 2013 contained approximately one or more of 165 different pesticides.  Even more alarming, the pesticides remained on the fruits and vegetables even after they were washed and peeled.

Purchasing all organic and local produce is ideal, however not always affordable or feasible.  To help make informed decisions about what goes in your grocery cart, and subsequently in your mouth, there are two lists containing produce with both the highest and lowest levels of pesticides.

The Dirty Dozen:

  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Nectarines
  • Strawberries
  • Grapes
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Imported Snap Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Leafy Greens and Hot Peppers – Not formally considered part of the Dirty Dozen, but are frequently contaminated with insecticides toxic to the human nervous system.

The Clean Fifteen:

  • Avocados
  • Sweet Corn
  • Pineapples
  • Cabbage
  • Frozen Sweet Peas
  • Onions
  • Asparagus
  • Mangoes
  • Papayas
  • Kiwis
  • Eggplant
  • Grapefruit
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet Potatoes

Eating organic produce ensures you consume fewer pesticides, but it is very important to wash all fruits and vegetables before consumption.  As a Mom, I try to buy all organic, as long-term studies have indicated impaired brain development in children.  The American Academy of Pediatrics has cited research that “linked pesticide exposure in early life with pediatric cancers, decreased cognitive function, and behavioral problems.”  Yikes!  No thanks.

If you have a terrible memory like I do, see below for an easy cheat sheet to bring with you to the grocery store.

Screen-shot-2015-02-25-at-8.50.53-PM

 

References:

EWG’s 2015 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce

American Academy of Pediatrics; Organic Foods: Health and Environmental Advantages and Disadvantages

2014 USDA Pesticide Data Program